Category Archives: Historic Conservation

How to Save Money with your Historic Restoration Project

Picking the Right Product for the Job Labor, materials, consultations, and other similar expenses are all factors that can really rack the price up of any restoration or construction project. Everyone would agree that the lower the cost of these expenses the better; however, always choosing the cheapest option may not be in the best […]

Israel Nature and Parks Authority The Conservation of the Archeological Parks The use of St. Astier Natural Hydraulic Limes

Israel Nature and Parks Authority The Conservation of the Archeological Parks The use of St. Astier Natural Hydraulic Limes First Preliminary Report Prepared by Asi Shalom September 2000   Preface The National Archaeological Parks of Israel include great and important epics of history from the beginning of humanity through biblical and classical times. During the […]

LOG CHINKING, YE ALDE CALK, MEND THE GAP BETWEEN BRICK/STONE AND FRAMES

If you have a “chink” in the armor of a building it is usually due to different or moving materials coming together and the need for a filler that accommodates the differential in movement between the two masses. Plastics may work but many owners wanting to go green don’t want that between their logs in […]

Restoring Mt. Vernon’s Upper Garden Wall

by Debra Grube and Samantha Horvath LimeWorks.us is providing a custom blend of our Ecologic™ Mortar for the restoration of Mt. Vernon’s Upper Garden Wall. Mt. Vernon was built in 1735 by George Washington’s father, Augustine, and George acquired Mount Vernon in 1754.  It began as a one and one-half story farmhouse, and over the next […]

Types of Masonry Binders

lime-and-cement-cycle by  Jessica (Focht) Aquiline, MSHP, LimeWorks.us Conservation Specialist Binders are materials that act as a bonding agent that when mixed with aggregate and water form mortar, which is used to bond various masonry units together playing a structural and decorative role in a building. There are four main binders that have been used throughout masonry […]

Restoring St. Patrick’s Cathedral

An Undertaking of Passion and Love LimeWorks.us is a big part of helping to restore a prominent landmark in New York City, St. Patrick’s Cathedral. The Cathedral was completed in 1878. Then in 1888 spires were added. The picture below is taken from near the top of one of one of the spires. The Cathedral […]

Chemistry of Lime Mortar – Neighborhood Preservation in Philadelphia

The Chemical Heritage Foundation released an episode of their award winning podcast Distillations.  In this episode, Randy Ruth, formerly of LimeWorks.us, discusses the chemistry behind lime mortar, historic masonry buildings and the ongoing efforts to preserve one of the finest works of notable Philadelphia architect, Frank Furness. The 19th Street Baptist Church located in South Philadelphia […]

Repointing the First Congregational Church Hudson, OH – A Restoration Success

Here’s a brief summary of the project at the First Congregational Church of Hudson (OH) project by John Burnell, Principal, Mason’s Mark LLC. The church was originally built in 1865 in historic Hudson, Ohio. It was repointed several decades ago with a cement-based mortar and started to develop brick deterioration problems in both interior and […]

Repair Campaign at the Rotunda, University of Virginia Restores with Lime

We’re so proud to be part of an incredible restoration campaign currently taking place at the University of Virginia. The Rotunda is the focal point of Thomas Jefferson’s Academical Village at UVA and we have the pleasure of supplying our Ecologic™ Mortar for the repointing campaign. Below is an excerpt from the university’s website explaining the […]

Preserving Historic Brick at the Shirley Plantation

The historic Shirley Plantation is situated along the James River right outside Richmond Virginia. It was constructed in the early 17th century and is the oldest family-owned business in North America as stated on their website. Today, unfortunately much of the brick that makes up the various buildings is literally falling apart. Spalling of the […]